Raisin Debt

Al-Masri al-Yum is a food blog founded in 2010 by the creators of The Boursa Exchange. It deals with the dining scene in Egypt, both at home and in restaurants.

The reasons we started the blog are severalfold:

First, complaining about Egyptian food is a hardy perennial Cairo whine amongst khawagat and others. As an alternative to whining, we’re suggesting a more constructive activity: Learning to cook. As a service to novices and advanced beginners alike, we publish recipes that, while not necessarily easily accomplished, have been successfully attempted in our Cairo kitchens.

Second, while we enjoy the restaurant reviews in some of our favorite local publications, we often find them a bit milquetoast for our tastes, sometimes reading like glorified press releases. Also, they often highlight only the most expensive restaurants. Since A Lawyer Orders Food in Cairo stopped regularly posting, there hasn’t been, by our lights, a restaurant review site willing to take a Real World approach to Cairo restaurants, when diners stop being polite and start being real. So we want to try and fill that gap.

Third, we love food, and it is sometimes very difficult to write about it, so we’ll try to sharpen our skills, and give our contributors the chance to do the same. Especially since we’re still on the fence about Sam Sifton, (Touche, Nadim…), and the Times might call at any minute.

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4 responses to “Raisin Debt

  1. Hello, al Masr al-Yum–

    Maybe you would be so kind as to circulate this announcement about Iraqi cooking classes.
    —————————————–
    Are you free this Saturday ?
    Resettlement Legal Aid Project, a program at St. Andrew’s Refugee Services,
    is excited to announce another round of Iraqi cooking classes. Come and
    learn how to cook fabulous traditional Iraqi specialities, while getting to
    know Iraqi refugees living in Cairo. In our office, we often have the chance
    to taste wonderful homemade Iraqi food and we’re now trying to share and
    spread this opportunity !
    The lessons will be taught in English, through a translator if the cook
    cannot speak English. The teacher will provide detailed instructions
    throughout the lesson and every student will participate in the cooking.
    Print-outs of the recipes, as well as translated list of ingredients will be
    available for the students to take home. Each cooking lesson will include
    learning to prepare appetizer, a main course, dessert, and Arabic tea. These
    classes are fundraisers, the cost will support our work providing legal,
    psychosocial and cultural advising to Cairo’s refugee population, along with
    English and literacy classes.
    **INFORMATION**
    *Date and time*: Saturday, January, 16 – 10.30am to 2.30p.m.
    *Location*: St. Andrew’s Refugee Services, 38 26th of July St. (Directly
    next to the Nasser Metro Station)
    *Cost:* 100 EGP, this includes the lesson, ingredients and utensils, and of
    course feasting on the delicious meal you cooked !
    Please alert of any cancellations 48 hours in advance of the class.
    For purposes of space availibility and in order to give everyone a chance to
    participate in the cooking, the number of participants has been limited to
    12. To reserve your spot now, or if you’d like any further information,
    email me at maelle.pellet…@gmail.com .
    Hope to see you Saturday !
    Maelle

  2. James Davies

    Hi there,

    An interesting alternative to dinning out in Cairo… is the Cairo Underground Supper Club… you can join through the facebook group.

    Also the facebook group Pharawnic Egypt deals alot with here to source hard to find ingredients in Cairo, seasonal produce, cooking classes, detoxes etc…

    Glad to see more writing for foodies in Cairo, look forward to your next post.

  3. Fun! I just discovered your site! I wish I could enjoy the Iraqi cooking classes!

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